July 24, 2014

#ThisIsBaltimore: July Edition

In early June, I posted a series of images which I have hash-tagged #ThisIsBaltimore. As you know, one raison d’etre of  this blog is to present the side of Baltimore that’s generally not seen by those who do not live here. Here’s a funny piece on Yahoo on what NOT to say to someone from Baltimore. Here.

The always amazing and fascinating American Visionary Art Museum.instagram1

The secret Buddha, a project of a student at Maryland Institute College of Art.image

A flag-holder at the University of Baltimore. image

Secret art installation for Artscape 2014, the largest free art festival in the USA.image

The Homeland Lakes, a series of urban lakes.image

The Rawlings Conservatory & Botanic Gardens in Druid Hill.image

An unusual roof-line and great windows – don’t they look like an artist’s garret? image

The Patterson Park Pagodaimage

An art installation made with old cast iron columns and stained glass. photo (3)

And what would Baltimore be without some of our local blue crabs?crabs

I’d like to continue this series once a month. It’s important to me to show people the city that I love and where my family has lived for more than 12 generations.

16 comments:

  1. Some wonderful snippets of Baltimore....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. There are so many treasures there that no one sees!

      Delete
  2. I love your #thisisbaltimore series! I am afraid I have committed many of those sins mentioned in that article ( yikes and sorry!) I went through the city once on an amtrak train going from new york to florida and i remember i was excited to go through some of the streets that were shown on the wire! Bet no one saw the beauty of those streets and were that happy before that show though ;) I would love to visit again but properly next time!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are easy sins to commit! And if you'd like to visit, I'd love to show you around!

      Delete
  3. I love all the art. I wonder what the story is behind the pagoda? It's such a wonderful folly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Pagoda, originally known as the Observatory, was designed in 1890 by Charles H. Latrobe, then Superintendent of Parks. While known as the Pagoda because of its oriental architectural appearance, the design was intended to reflect the bold Victorian style of the day. From the top of the tower one can view downtown, Baltimore’s many neighborhoods, the Patapsco River, the Key Bridge and Fort McHenry.

      Delete
  4. great post + love "what not to say" xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is even funnier: http://citythatbreeds.com/2014/07/top-10-list-of-things-that-real-baltimoreans-hate-about-that-list-of-things-that-real-baltimoreans-love/

      Delete
  5. Where is the art installation located? I would love to see it in person!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The little cowboy is at the intersection of North and the JFX exit and Mount Royal. Don't know if it was just there for Artscape. The other one is at Druid Hill Park, right next to the Rawlings Conservatory.

      You can track my travels by my instagram feed... and that's probably not a good thing!

      Delete
  6. I really enjoyed this post. You highlighted some things that even as a Baltimorean, I was unaware of. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love blue crags!!!! I lived in Maryland for six years and those crabs still call to me. Great photos--yes, Baltimore is a great city. thanks Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most unfortunately, I am allergic to crabs!

      Delete
  8. I've never been to Baltimore! Honestly, I always think of John Waters - love him, too. You show us a much more elegant Baltimore, it seems like a place I would like!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We always say that we're more than John Waters and The Wire!

      Delete

Thank you for reading and commenting on Pigtown*Design. I read each and every comment and try to reply if I have your e-mail address.