June 17, 2014

Stone Houses

The first house where my family lived when I was a child was an old stone house. The walls were thick and the house was covered with Virginia Creeper which was beautiful green in the summer and then turned a glorious red in the fall.image I have always had a thing for stone houses and cottages. Baltimore is full of them, and there’s even a neighbourhood called Stone Hill, from which my friend Nelle writes her blog, Stone Hill Farm.

I thought I’d share some of my favourite stone houses around Baltimore. Come along…

This one’s a mile or so from my house and I like the back of it much more than the front. Here’s the back.stone

And the front.image

This is a house that I’ve always loved. It was sold a year or so ago after being on the market for ages. It’s been cleaned and cleared up. I wrote about it here.image

Many of the houses in the area where I live have an English or French influence as you can see by this one. imageimageimage

Two views of the same house, which I’ve loved for years.imageimageThese were probably designed by Palmer & Lambdin, architects in Baltimore in the early 1900’s, who had a certain style. I will do a post about them sometime, when I can get a lot of images of their lovely houses.imageimage

Which is your favourite?

17 comments:

  1. The last one is my favorite. Just my size. I love stone cottages.

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  2. Stone houses are cool, especially in the summer (pun intended). I like the home with the iron balustrade on the upper level.

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    1. Our house, the top one, had thick stone walls and stayed very cool.

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  3. Last one, also. Love the roof line.

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    1. Can't you imagine this with a thatch roof?

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  4. These are lovely! So storybook.

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  5. There is an on-going trend in my area for new houses trying to resemble picturesque English cottages, with varied rooflines, different window sizes, and a range of materials including stone. But the stone veneer is always applied like random terrace flagstone paving; it is all a huge mess. Everyone of these houses is totally charming however and a great example of its type.

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    1. Ohhh... that sounds awful! These houses are all from the early 1900's when building was done right.

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  6. Love the last one! Roof has a thatched feel. Dreamy.

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  7. Sigh, sigh again! I love them all; but the last one has my heart. Thanks for my morning East Coast fix. xoxo
    Mary

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  8. I favor the 4th image + love all of them + so charming. xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  9. Stone houses always carried a certain charm around them for me.
    ~Sophia
    http://plaidismyfavouritecolour.blogspot.com/

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  10. That one that's a mile or so from your house has something wrong going on with the front. I don't think anyone would have placed a column smack dab in the middle of the porch. I think one must have been removed at some point and they moved the other one over to make it symmetrical. I think I'd also paint the inverted porch to match to the stone to unite the two sides as well as highlight the front door. But what do I know?

    I like the house that you like. The one with the stone pay over the front door.

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  11. Love these old stone homes as they exude such provenance. I suspect they are warm in the winter and cool in the summer as well.

    best, teaorwine

    teaorwine.blogspot.com

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  12. I love a old stone house. There are so few in my area - Bloomington IN does have some nice old stone homes and that is somewhat close. I like the very last house.

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