March 6, 2017

On a Sunny Sunday

Sometimes, you just have to hop in the car and take off somewhere! That’s what I did on Sunday. After being super scheduled for the past month, things are beginning to clear up a bit and I found myself with a free day. So, off I went to explore.

I grew up in a neighbourhood designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, the famed landscape architect who created Central Park in NYC. One of his hallmarks is using the land as his guide, following the curves of the hills and valleys to create non-linear streetscapes. Roland Park, where I lived, has a lot of hills, but the neighborhood I wanted to explore, Sudbrook Park, is basically flat with winding streets, open spaces and large historic houses. You enter the neighbourhood over a one-lane bridge and then the streets branch out before you.

IMG_5821

Most of the houses were in the shingle cottage style. I was particularly taken with these two, which are similar, but the two-story windows are a little different.
IMG_5820 IMG_5823

And I adored this one.IMG_5819

I couldn’t quite figure this one out. Nothing seemed quite right about it. IMG_5827

From Sudbrook Park, I headed up the road to see one of my favourite buildings. It’s the current HQ for the Maryland State Police, but at one point, it was the Home for Confederate Veterans where my many greats-grandfather was exiled after the Civil War. Processed with Snapseed.

I think it’s such a handsome place, looking more like a house in New Orleans than Baltimore. IMG_5845

The whole property is fascinating.home It’s sort of Georgian in design, with what were originally barracks for the old soldiers, surrounding a courtyard. IMG_5833IMG_5839IMG_5837

And the details are so interesting. This is sort of a turret with an eagle and shield on it.
IMG_5840 IMG_5841

From there, I headed over to a nearby thrift shop where I always have great luck! I picked up this Emma Bridgewater Union Jack mug for a pittance. IMG_5850

And this antique apothecary bottle for slightly more than a pittance. IMG_5858IMG_5859

I still haven’t quite figured out what Ol. Gaulth is, although I think gault is a heavy clay. Hmmm. Any ideas?

16 comments:

  1. I believe that is Oil of Wintergreen, Oleum Gaultherium, or Methyl Salicylate. It can be toxic when taken internally, but in small doses is a pain reliever related to aspirin (Acetylsalicylic Acid). It is also used as a fragrance and as a flavoring agent. Does the bottle smell minty ? I wouldn't want to get too much of it on me.
    Best to you -
    - Michael in SC

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And funnily, i have numerous copies of Materia Medica at my office!

      Delete
  2. Brilliant! I am sure that is what it is! There is residue in the bottle, but I haven't sniffed it yet!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello Meg, I second Oil of Wintergreen. The wintergreen plant is called Gaultheria procumbens, and its essence was a standard medicinal ingredient.
    --Jim

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jim! I googled Ol. Gaulth and didn't come up with anything. Love my blog readers!

      Delete
  4. Susan Stiles DowellMarch 7, 2017 at 3:40 PM

    You are so INTERESTING, Meg!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Rats, they beat me to it. Well, here's my research result:

    Wintergreen is a group of aromatic plants. The term "wintergreen" once commonly referred to plants that remain green (continue photosynthesis) throughout the winter. The term "evergreen" is now more commonly used for this characteristic.

    Most species of the shrub genus Gaultheria demonstrate this characteristic and are called wintergreens in North America, the most common generally being the American wintergreen (Gaultheria procumbens). Wintergreens in the genus Gaultheria contain an aromatic compound, methyl salicylate, and are used as a mintlike flavoring.

    ReplyDelete
  6. P.S. "Olibanum" is Frankincense....

    ReplyDelete
  7. I've lived in Sudbrook Park since 1947. Can't seem to move away. Such a wonderful community.

    Which thrift store? I would have ripped that Union Jack Emma mug right out of your hands if I had been there ... with a smile of course. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Julee... I can't believe I had never been to SP! I loved it!

      And keep this quiet, but it is the Hadassah Thrift Shop on Rtown Road.

      Delete
    2. Shhhhhhhh ... I won't say a word.

      Delete
    3. And of course, Julee... if you'd like to show me around Sudbrook Park, I'd love a personal tour!

      Delete
  8. Also... I'll take the shingled house with the green shutters and the front porch!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Okay Okay, do you suppose these households had a ROOM dedicated to sewing? MFF did you have a sewing machine in your house when you were growing up? If so do you remember the name/make/model? Just curious conducting an informal survey of savvy women/skilled machinists/home economists/textile artisans and their instruments of Creation! Please comment y'all.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We did have a sewing machine, it was an old treadle machine. My mother used to make us matching shifts for the summer! I, however, didn't learn to sew until about 2010 when we had yards of snow!

      Delete

Thank you for reading and commenting on Pigtown*Design. I read each and every comment and try to reply if I have your e-mail address.