August 26, 2014

A Country Garden at the End of August

I had a chance to see Jonathan’s garden over the weekend after a day of light but steady rain. I was there a little the “golden hour”, that time an hour or so before the sun sets, when the light is clear and golden, but it was stunning nevertheless. It’s fun to look back at the garden over the past few months and see how much it has flourished. June. July. It is set up for the washed out dinner party. IMG_2740

One of the things I like most about this garden is all of the “rooms” with something at the end of the vista that draws your eye. This old iron bench is the perfect example, and it’s just one of a number scattered through the gardens.IMG_2743

The cutting garden, which is anchored by an iron armillary, is a riot of colours, shapes and scents. IMG_2754IMG_2752

There are plants as varied as globe amaranth, dahlias, zinnias, cockscomb, and even some lowly marigolds. IMG_2748IMG_2750IMG_2761IMG_2763IMG_2765IMG_2766IMG_2777

The garden then opens up into one of several more rooms, this one with white cast iron benches around the perimeter, just waiting for a game of combat croquet on the beautiful and flat lawn. Funnily enough, before this garden was built, I remember a cut-throat game of softball between the staffs at the Baltimore Museum of Art, where I worked, and the Maryland Historical Society where my friend worked. IMG_2779

Looking at one of the center urns, you see another variety of plants, including this wavy datura, or the poisonous jimsonweed. IMG_2780It’s only when you look closely at the plant that you see the incredible seed pods. IMG_2783

The plants in the urn have really flourished, and the sweet-potato vine is spilling over the edges and the coleus around the base carries on the green and deep purple theme. IMG_2785

Moving through the arches of hyacynth beans,IMG_2801IMG_2803 IMG_2823

you come to the big cutting and vegetable garden and it is a RIOT of colour!IMG_2845IMG_2805IMG_2843IMG_2849IMG_2841IMG_2833

The tomatoes at the top, and pumpkins at the bottom, are both going crazy, IMG_2815

the espaliered apples are looking like they will provide a good crop, IMG_2837

and somehow, even the figs managed to survive the winter and fruit (which we ate with prosciutto around them).IMG_2797

As we headed back towards the house, we stopped to look at the spent clematis, IMG_2859

and gather the dogs. IMG_2867

By this time, it really was the golden hour and I managed to get a couple of shots of the lawn set up for the washed out dinner. IMG_2871IMG_2873IMG_2877

After dinner, as I was leaving, I remarked that I could smell gardenias blooming, and Jonathan gave me one, which put mine to shame! This had to be at least four inches across! Mine might be two inches.IMG_2881

Thanks to Jonathan for a tour of the garden and for a great Sunday supper of Saturday’s leftovers… and some other dishes!

22 comments:

  1. Hello Meg, That is indeed a magical yard. I never understood how people could maintain a garden and still have time to accomplish anything else. My favorite photos here are the first two, which emphasize the greenery while establishing a human scale.
    --Jim

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    1. It's actually a very human-scaled garden, probably in toto, less than an acre. Just done very well.

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  2. Replies
    1. It was the perfect afternoon to visit it.

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  3. This garden takes my breath away! Thanks for the gorgeous photos.

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  4. Replies
    1. Thanks! A lot of work making a garden look that good - and perfect weather this summer.

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  5. Hi Meg, So incredibly beautiful!! Have a fantastic week. xoxo Mary

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    1. We have had a decent amount of rain here - in fact, six inches in one day - and it had rained the day before, so everything was lush and green.

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  6. stunning + loved your photos xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  7. Truly a privilege to have toured this magnificent garden in person. Fabulous photos, Meg. Mine didn't turn out that great :( But I'm still planning on sharing them after we come back from Maine. BTW, will you accompany me to their shop one day? I could pick you up, and we can do shopping and lunch. xo

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  8. Replies
    1. Thanks! All I can take credit for is the pix!

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  9. I love this every time you show it to us. Can't wait to see it snow-covered:).

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    Replies
    1. I can't imagine why I didn't take pix over the winter. Lord knows it snowed enough.

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  10. Stiles has done a wonderful job doing up Halcyon Farm is such style, I'm sure his parents would be proud. It's a shame they didn't hold onto the Caves Farm spread of his grandfather, C. Ewing Tuttle.

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    1. Ohhh... who is this? Clearly you know the property!

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