March 18, 2015

The Bone Broth Bandwagon

Connor’s been feeling poorly the last few weeks, and I know he’s aching. I was reading an article in the Financial Times a week or so ago about bone broth and how good it is for you. According to the FT, “It is filled with easily assimilated proteins and amino acids that are the building blocks of tissues. Amino acids repair the tissue damage — they are good for rosacea and heal inflammation and infection in acne. Hyaluronic acid and collagen attract water to the cells and plump up skin from the inside.” While they were talking about fashion models during Paris Fashion week, I thought I’d try it out for Connor and maybe even for me!

I started by buying some bones, and got some neck bones, shin bones and ox tails, which I think are actually from cows. IMG_9284I put them into the oven on 350*F for about a half an hour. The house filled with the most gorgeous smell from the roasting meat. About half-way through the cooking, I turned each piece over to make sure it cooked evenly.IMG_9285

After they’d cooked a bit, I took them out and filled a huge pot with cold water and added the bones. IMG_9290Because of the cold weather we’ve been having, the cold water is realllly cold, and I could hear the hot bones cracking in the cold water. IMG_9291

After the bones came to a boil, I turned the flame way down and it will cook for the next several hours. Just before I go to bed, I will pull the bones out and strain the broth, or stock into jars and refrigerate them. The fat in the broth solidifies on the top, and it’s simple to remove it before it’s served. IMG_9292

For Connor, I will pour it over some dry dog food and for me, I will attempt to drink it. Although I do love things like bouillon and consommé, I am not sure I will like this.

I make a similar broth or stock for Connor all the time, but I use a roasted chicken carcass. After the chicken bones have simmered for an hour or so, I take them out of the stock, and then reduce the stock by about half. If I do it right, the collagen in the bones jells the stock a bit and Connor loves it.

If this works out and he likes it, I will invest in a good stock pot. I used to have the most gorgeous copper stock pot, but I got rid of it when I moved to the UK, and haven’t really needed a huge pot since then.

30 comments:

  1. I hope Connor loves it and gets better quickly. Is there a canine pool near you? That also helps his breed with common aches.

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    1. I think it's old age. Combine that with the fact that I didn't get him until he was 5-ish, I don't know his past history, except for the fact that at some point, he had a broken leg. There is a long scar on his leg that looks surgical.

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  2. A good mother - made with love! 🐶💙

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  3. I make my bone broth in a pressure cooker; takes a fraction of the time and comes out just as good. I use the instructions from www.nomnompaleo.com.

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    1. I second the pressure cooker. The easiest method I've found is from Lorna Sass: https://pressurecookingwithlornasass.wordpress.com/2013/12/12/no-nonsense-chicken-broth/.

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  4. I made turkey stock yesterday. I had deboned a turkey breast and saved the bones. I even threw in a few chicken thigh bones from deboning them. I also put some carrots and parsley. This morning I strained the broth and took the turkey, chicken, broth and carrots and mixed it with the dogs food (I have two pit bulls). I love watching them gobble it down. I have never tried the beef broth but I will now. I love my dogs and if there is anything I can do to help them, I will. I hope Connor feels better soon. I think the warm weather will help all of us.

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    1. I need to get a stock pot if i make this again. My biggest pot wasn't big enough. In the end, because of space in the pot, it only made about 3 cups of broth.

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  5. I make this for myself quite often but do not remove the bones while the broth is reducing. I, too, start off with a full pot of cold water and cook it down over hours on low heat to one-third of liquid. The longer I leave the bones, the richer the broth and I don't always need to roast the bones ahead of time -- the roasted marrow would never make it into the pot as this is a favorite of mine. Lately I've been using turkey backs bought at Whole Foods for under $1 (now I sound like my grandmother!). The apartment will smell like roast turkey and the broth will be rich with turkey flavor. I pick off the turkey meat in the early stages of cooking and save it for soup. The collagen extracted from the long cooking of the turkey (or chicken) bones will be evident when the broth is cooled and becomes jello-like. I've never been much of a turkey fan, but this broth is really delicious.

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    1. I am thinking that it if you did a few bones at a time, you could do this in a crock pot.

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    2. I'm rather old school and only have a stock pot that I bought new from the Salvation Army. I work mostly at home so have the luxury of time for stove-top cooking. Can't imagine why the crock pot wouldn't work, especially for feeding Connor broth on a regular basis.

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  6. Hugs for you and Connor. I think he'll love the broth.

    I consume mostly a vegetarian diet, but this sounds like something worth making an exception for. Our Finn is also feeling sub par and I may make some broth for him. Thanks for the idea.

    The thought of a pressure cooker shortening the time is very appealing. I've been looking at this thing on Amazon and might just pull the trigger and go for it. http://smile.amazon.com/Instant-Pot-IP-DUO60-Programmable-Generation/dp/B00FLYWNYQ/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1426689837&sr=8-4&keywords=one+pot

    Kathleen

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    1. Thanks, Kathleen. He seemed to like it when i put it over his kibble this morning. Hugs to Finn from us.

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  7. Best wishes to you and Connor. This is such a loving thing to do for your chum, I'm sure he and his tummy will appreciate it.

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    1. Thanks! He seemed to like it this morning!

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  8. Meg, I'm probably going to suggest something you may already do. Several years ago, I rescued a severely abused shepherd/lab mix about six years old. He had been confined most of his life in a wire cage much too small for a dog his size. When I first brought him home, his hind legs sloped downward and he was suffering from arthritis due to his confinement and starvation. I introduced salmon (either cooked or canned) in addition to something akin to your broth over his dry food. I also gave him two tablets of Cosequin (maximum strength), appropriate for his size and weight, daily. You can also use glucosamine with chondroitin (ask vet for accurate amount). Within six months, his hind legs were almost normal and his arthritis was much improved. Ultimately, around age twelve, I had a ramp built for him, as I had six steps that he was no longer able to maneuver. I lost him at age thirteen to bloat. I have since followed this diet with all of my rescue pets. Good luck to you and Connor. He is so lucky to have such a wonderful mother and I know you feel blessed to have him. Angela Muller

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    1. Thanks, Angela... i do some of this - the glucoasmine with chondroitin tablets and some fish. I think it's old age that's the issue. I try to keep him downstairs at night, but he sits at the bottom of the stairs and barks until he can come up. But sooner or later, he's got to stay downstairs. The steps are too steep and too many.

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  9. Definitely look into an electric pressure cooker/ slow cooker. I bought a regular pressure cooker, but now I wish I'd bought one of those. I make bone broth all the time. It is magic!

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  10. Hi, I came over from the with brush in hand blog, and wanted to mention that it's super easy making broth in a crockpot. And you can run it for 24 hours and get an amazing broth out of it. I used to do the soup pot method, but now I set it all up and let it cook for 24 hours and it's much richer and darker.

    Sorry about your dog. One of ours was acting really slow and lethargic and got really sick. We ended up changing her food. It's made all the difference. We were using Beneful, and now we use Science Diet grain free. Not sure it would help, but thought I'd mention it.

    Take care!

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    1. Thanks. He gets something (can't remember what) that's grain-free... usually with chicken stock over it.

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  11. This is good, old-fashioned beef broth. The trendy, somewhat-edgy, somewhat-paleo term "bone broth" gives it a sinister air that generations of grandmothers wouldn't recognize.

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    1. I know! I always just called it stock!

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  12. When my husband had an ulcer and had to have blood transfusions, I made beef bone broth with lots of marrow. His doctor—who dissed on me when I asked what foods could I cook that would help with a "that's why we have modern pharmacology"—was impressed with his rapid response. When our 14 year old dog was ailing, I made this for him. I think the magic is in the T-cells of the bones...and then, of course, there's the love. All the best to the old guy. Connor will always be special.

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    1. Thanks! He is slowing down a lot, but still wants to walk. After a little while, i can tell he's struggling though. So sad.

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  13. Oh Meg I do hope this will help Connor and make him feel better. You are indeed a god Mother!!
    xoxo
    Karena
    The Arts by Karena
    A New Gallery in Town!

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    1. Trying to be the best that I can be for him!

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  14. I love that you made him bone broth/stock. I do it for my husband - just cooked a whole bunch of beef shank this week. We do the best to care for that which we love:).

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  15. I did not notice any mention of garlic, onions, or spices in the creation of this broth. I don't think I would like any broth that only consisted of meat/bones in hot water. If you added a bay leaf or celery, some onions, garlic, and/or other spices during the cooking process, it would be tasty indeed!

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