June 27, 2012

House Hunting–Still Not Me!

When I was looking for the listing of the house I showed the other day, which wasn’t listed until late in the evening, I had a chance to check out some of the other houses for sale in the same zip code.

The one thing to know about this neighbourhood – it’s where I grew up – is that almost all of the houses are 100+ years old, and that the development was designed by Frederick Law Olmstead’s company.image He also designed Central Park in NYC, and took great advantage of the contours of the land when laying out roads and plots. This neighbourhood is the first planned community in the United States, and rightly proud of that fact.

This house is on the older side of the neighbourhood, and it’s typical of the time of its design – lots of porches, as well as beautiful shingle work, an eyebrow window and other details.image

It looks like some of the original details are intact. I think this is the turret room on the first/ground floor.image

I love this newel post!image

I’ve always loved this house. It’s perched at the edge of a hill, with views over the local golf course, and the valley. image

I love the beadboard ceiling of the porch, but I can’t quite figure out the huge empty frame on the wall.image

I love the front door!image

Honestly, I can’t decide whether I like this kitchen or not. What do you think?image

A lot of these houses have a back entrance – ours did – so that you don’t have to climb the 50+ steps from the garage to the front door. image

A friend of mine lived in this house, and I always thought the pergola-style porch roof was fabulous.image

Try to ignore the furnishings and concentrate on the amazing doorways. image

And this incredible ceiling.image

Honestly? I would murder for those cabinets along the wall, but the one around the fridge is another story.image

And it’s got a swinging door into a pantry! This is very similar to the pantry at our house, but our cabinets weren’t glass-fronted. imageI am not sure which I like more, the ceiling or the floor! image

Of course, I’d love to hear your comments!

26 comments:

  1. So like the house I grew up in. Porches and shingles. Glass front cabinets. Love 'em.

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    1. Pat... there's nothing better than porches and shingles! Unless it's old glass-fronted cabinets.

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  2. Is it really the first planned community? For Maryland maybe, but for the United States? Did you mention the name of this neighborhood. I would like to read more documentation Thanks on the web F. Rogers

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    1. http://www.rolandpark.org/rphistory.html. there is a ton of information about this community.

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  3. For me, the top house takes the cake. And that kitchen? Gah. Rich people have no imagination - they all buy the same crap. I used to be the "go-fer" for a construction guy out in the Hamptons, and I would be inside six or seven McMansions a day... they all had the same kitchens. Gra-a-a-a-anite countertops, stainless steel everything else, crown molding out the wazoo, marble floors, enormous islands, ZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz..... If I was rich, I'd travel the world and find unique and interesting pieces to create rooms with. Imagination and eccentricity and antiques and vintage stuff and nothing like anything anyone else would have.

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    1. I didn't even want to see any houses with granite, stainless steel, etc. kitchen. hate them, and they are already cliche and dated.

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  4. Great pictures of great houses. I wish that more people were familiar with this aspect of Baltimore rather than just what they see on "The Wire." Some of the people who lived in Roland Park, Guilford, and Homeland were outstanding ladies and gentlemen. Although I didn't live in such an expensive place at the time myself, I remember meeting some of the people and admiring these beautiful houses when I was a student at Hopkins in the 1960's. Before that, I remember that our chaplain at McDonogh was minister at Roland Park Pres Church - Dr. Kerr -- a very fine man indeed. Growing up in Baltimore was fun.

    Thanks again -- David In Raleigh

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    1. That's my mantra, David... It's not just The Wire!

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  5. The details in these older houses really make the difference in their wide spaces. I just love them, even the odd ones.

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    1. Kerry. the devil is in the details, and that's what makes these houses incredible.

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  6. There are so many unique and wonderful details that would be easy to overlook; especially when distracted by the furnishings!

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  7. F. Rogers here. Love the subject of urban and regional planning. The link you provided certainly sets the record straight. Thanks much Peg.

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  8. Meg, Frederick Law Olmstead also designed the 125,000 acre grounds of Biltmore Estate in Asheville, North Carolina, for George Vanderbilt. Have you been there? http://www.fredericklawolmsted.com/biltmore.html
    and
    http://www.biltmore.com/


    If you're a fan of historic preservation, it's worth a weekend trip to tour the home and gardens. Because the Biltmore is still owned by the Vanderbilt family, much of the original furnishings remain, including family oil portraits, a Renoir, and meticulous textile restorations.

    Oh, and I have a theory about the empty picture frame. Did you get these pictures from MLS? I think that an oil painting was removed either because it's very valuable and they didn't want to broadcast that it was in the home, or that it's a big, embarrassing naked picture of the owner's wife on a bear skin rug. ;-)

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    1. Rebecca - I heard an interview with the writer of a new book about Olmstead. He was quite the guy, although one with many mental health problems.

      And I love your bear-skin rug theory!

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  9. Olmsted had a huge impact on Kansas City, Missouri as well (where I grew up) All of these shots look like home to me. Makes me miss an old house! I can't figure out why people out here (in So Cal), don't see these houses, and tell their 'builder' "like this! with wrap around porches, big heavy doors and coffered ceilings!" Instead they say, 'Like that one, next door. With big fake columns, hollow doors and details reminiscent of Taco Bell"

    love the post.

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  10. adore seeing these houses + thanks Meg..xxpeggybraswelldesign.com

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  11. WOW double wow --the guy responsible for the Kansas City park and boulevards, a George Kessler, who worked briefly with F.L.O. on Central park; was employed by the Roland Prk Co. Kessler designed Woodlawn Estate in Md-- Now the only Olmsted directly associated with Roland Park (according to the web page PD referenced -- which is a great read) Is in 1901 F.L.O. Junior designed plat 2 no wonder the similarities --the influences of mentors borrowing great ideas developing a POV Please read the history page of Roland Park and learn the truth

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    1. The Roland Park website has a lot of great information. And all of the papers about establishing Roland Park were just moved down from Cornell to Johns Hopkins.

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  12. Heavens you're quick. Lunchtime at work and another blog since I last looked five hours ago ie Connor. These houses are just wonderful, love the curved dining room. I'm with you on the grey kitchen cabinets. They are too dark. As always want to see them in the snow.

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  13. I may just give everyone who reads your blog a heart attack. If you have an aversion to "paint wood" stop reading right now.

    Everything that is "wrong "with that house is that everything is the "wrong color" All that wood.....and I mean ALL of it.......is the wrong color. Today...we want interiors that we are comfortable living in.

    I would paint every sing;e cabinet; every door, ever cupboard door.......My fingers are itching for the paintbrush!

    I am helping out our daughter "restore a lovely old house in Montecito" (old is 1935) A heavenly house designed by a very famous architect at the time.....(In California; and "old house" would be considered a new house anywhere in the East)!!

    Men, in particular. have some "religion" about painting out "wood" You have no idea the problems it instantly solves

    Just my opinion......a lovely house.......held back by its "wood colors"!


    Wonderful "bones"!

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  14. Paint vs wood well some costly woods with a fine grain are stained so the educated person can recognise the grain and know the wood. Pine and soft woods are painted to protect them as they are soft. Some furniture is made from several types of wood therefore they take a stain differently hence dark stains to unify the piece. Yes dark chuncky heavy pieces can be lifted up with a coat of paint but one man's meat is another man's poison. This is what makes the world go round Diversity tolerance and compassion. Oh thank you so much PD for the Reggie Darling link. He is a peach. --Unnamed White Horse Souce

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    1. Dear Unnamed... we had cabinets almost exactly like these in our house that was just a few blocks from this one, and looks like it was built by the same people, at the same time, and they were cypress. And just gorgeous wood!

      Glad you like Reggie! He's fab!

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